Master Surface Design Skills at Philadelphia University

Surface design is a fast-growing career niche because the definition of “printing” today extends well beyond ink on paper. Today, digital printing and finishing equipment can be used to custom decorate the surfaces of all sorts of 2D and 3D products, including displays, packaging, textiles, glass, ceramics, garments, signs, objects, and wallcoverings. Plus, 2D documents, photographs, and artwork can be digitally embellished with coatings that add surface textures.

The accelerating adoption of “fabrication printing” equipment within industries, commercial printing firms, and surface design studios will create new career paths in interior design, apparel design, experiential graphic design, and related fields.

To meet the growing demand for surface designers and creative technologists who understand what’s possible with fabrication printing technologies, Philadelphia University has created an M.S. in Surface Imaging degree. The M.S. in Surface Imaging program at Philadelphia University is now accepting new degree candidates for 2017-2018. This one-year program will start May 16 2017. Successful students graduate the following summer, 2017.

PhilaU-SurfaceImaging

The Surface Imaging program at Philadelphia University uses a variety of state-of-the-art digital printing technologies at the Center for Excellence in Surface Imaging. By applying your existing skills in painting, drawing, photography and printmaking skills, you will learn how to create new types of products through “fabrication printing” technologies including additive material deposition and laser engraving.

To learn more about the program, you can visit the Center for Excellence in Surface Imaging and see the types of projects that students have completed in previous year.

Curriculum

The curriculum includes courses in surface imaging design, printing technology, and material and polymer science. Coursework also focuses on entrepreneurship and business plan creation so you can integrate design, applied engineering, and business skills as a “TechCreative” in the fast-changing printing business.

As a student in the Surfacing Imaging program, you will gain professional  experience through  research-based projects with industry partners. These projects stress critical thinking and problem-solving skills through teamwork and collaboration. You will also gain extensive experience working on interdisciplinary projects using advanced technology and design solutions.

Students also will have access to the Center for Excellence in Surface Imaging, which has been supported by international imaging industries, including printer manufacturers, ink formulators and software developers.

The deadline for applications is February 1, 2017. For more information, visit www.philau.edu/mssurfaceimaging and download the program information sheet.

 

 

Fast Large-Format 3D Printer Produces Displays, Props, Objects up to 6 ft. Tall

A super-fast, large format 3D printer is set to transform the creation of high-level marketing, advertising, and themed-environment projects. The Massivit 1800 large format 3D printer can produce high-quality 3D pieces up to 6 ft. high at build speed of up to 1 ft. per hour.  It is being promoted to large-format graphics providers that specialize in creating eye-catching signs and displays.

Adding ‘the next dimension’ to visual communications, the Massivit 1800 is expected to change how creative directors, product designers, and marketers think about what’s possible with 3D models, displays, and brand promotion.

The Massivit 1800

The Massivit 1800 system is the fastest large format 3D printer on the market. It was developed by people who have dedicated their careers to delivering large-format digital printing equipment. As a group, the founders and managers have well over 100 years of experience in large-format digital printing and over 50 years of experience in 3D printing. They come from a variety of disciplines (management, engineering, printing, chemistry, and software) and have a substantial track record in R&D for companies such as Objet, HP Scitex, Idanit, and Scitex Vision.

At the heart of the Massivit 1800 system is a proprietary Gel Dispensing Printing (GDP) technology that enables instant solidification and high-speed printing. The gel is sensitive to UV light and solidifies into a hard polymer when it exposed to the LED UV light unit onboard the printer. The material is non-flammable and has a structural strength similar to the ABS materials commonly used in 3D printing.

Many objects designed for temporary promotional and decorative displays, movie sets, and themed environments don’t need to totally solid. Thus, they can be printed as only a “shell.” The Massivit 1800 printer saves production time and materials by printing non-vertical walls and ceilings without a solid or elaborate support structure.

Massivit-Tomato

“For print providers, the Massivit 1800 dramatically enhances the ability to create eye-catching visual communications that better engage target audiences,” said Avner Israeli, CEO, Massivit 3D.  Recent studies suggest that 3D advertising has five times the stopping power and four times the staying power of 2D advertising.

“Our products will enable marketing/brand managers to maximize the impact of their campaigns with a never-before-seen ‘wow factor.'” said Israeli.

Carisma Operates First Massivit 1800 in U.S.

The first Massivit 1800 in the United States is currently in operation at Carisma, a large-format printing company based in Brooklyn, New York.

Carisma-EasterIsland1

Carisma helps companies execute one-of-a-kind advertising campaigns, many of which are on double-decker buses across America. Carisma plans to put the Massivit 1800 to work for some of these campaigns.

“As always, I was looking for the next big thing — a technology edge — that can help me bring something different to my customers,” said Moshe Gil, Carisma owner and CEO. To help customers create memorable and noticeable advertising, “We were the first to put LED screens on buses for advertising, and we are one of the first who printed lenticular lenses and placed them on buses. Now will be the first to have 3D-printed elements on buses.”

“We are happy to see how a print-service provider such as Carisma is putting the Massivit 1800 to work in the advertising world,” said Israeli. “As their name suggests, the team at Crarisma has a lot of charisma, and is driving the industry to great heights. 3-dimensional advertisments on buses are going to be a big hit.”

This retail display for a watch was created on a Massivit 1800 in Israel by ES Digital.
This retail display for a watch was created on a Massivit 1800 by ES Digital in Israel (www.esdigital.co.il/en).

 

Creative Group Survey Reveals Hiring Trends through End of 2016

In a recent hiring trends survey by The Creative Group staffing firm, 13 percent of advertising and marketing executives said they plan to expand their teams in the second half of 2016. This is up from 11 percent in the first half of the year.

The majority (59 percent) of respondents said they expect to maintain staffing levels and hire primarily to fill  vacated positions in the next six months.

In addition, 20 percent of the advertising executives and 10 percent of the marketing executives anticipate increasing the number of freelance staff during the remainder of the year.

“Many companies are adding to their bench of marketing talent, particularly within the digital space,” said Diane Domeyer, executive director of The Creative Group. “Employers seek professionals who can help build their businesses’ online presence, support year-end campaigns, and strategize for the future.”

Creative Specialties in Demand

When executives were asked in which areas they plan to add staff in the second half of 2016, they reported a variety of specialties. Topping the list (at 18 percent each) were content marketing, brand/product management, digital marketing, and web design/production.

When advertising and marketing executives were asked, “In which of the following areas do you expect to hire in the second half of 2016?” Their responses were:

  • Content marketing: 18%
  • Brand/product management: 18%
  • Digital marketing: 18%
  • Web design/production: 18%
  • Marketing research: 17%
  • Creative/art direction: 17%
  • Print design/production: 17%
  • Customer experience: 17%
  • Social media: 16%
  • Media services: 15%
  • Public relations: 14%
  • Copywriting: 14%
  • Account services: 13%
  • Interactive media: 10%
  • Mobile design/development: 10%

(Multiple responses were permitted; Top responses shown.)

Recruiting Challenges

Forty-one percent of advertising and marketing executives said it is difficult to find skilled creative professionals today. Hiring managers at small advertising agencies (20-49 employees) and large advertising agencies (100+ employees) expect the greatest difficulty, with 50 percent of respondents in each group reporting that it is somewhat or very challenging to find the talent they seek.

When asked which types of roles were most difficult to fill, the top responses were web design/production, customer experience, and brand/product management.

About the Research

The national study was developed by The Creative Group and conducted by an independent research firm. It is based on 400 telephone interviews — with 200 marketing executives randomly selected from companies with 100 or more employees and 100 advertising executives randomly selected from agencies with 20 or more employees.

About The Creative Group

The Creative Group (TCG) specializes in connecting interactive, design, marketing, advertising, and public relations talent with the best companies on a project, contract-to-hire, and full-time basis.

TCG Infographic

 

Photographer Creates Single-Image Art Photography Wallcoverings

In late 2014, celebrity photographer and designer Don Flood launched his first collection of FLIEPAPER art photography wallcoverings produced by Astek Wallcoverings. He followed that with the Palm Springs collection earlier this year.

Graphic and sophisticated, each FLIEPAPER art photography wallcovering is symphony of color, texture, and design with an emphasis on scale. Designs range from immense florals and bold textures to quirky, unexpected found objects. FLIEPAPER designs are digitally printed using an eco-friendly process and can be customized in color and design.

FLIEPAPER by Don Flood (www.fliepaper.com)
FLIEPAPER by Don Flood (www.fliepaper.com)

Flood’s FLIEPAPER designs have appeared in environments as varied as a high-end café in Santa Monica to a private elevator in a Redondo Beach luxury home.

Quartz art wallcovering
FLIEPAPER by Don Flood (www.fliepaper.com)

At the International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF) in May, Flood introduced his newest line of art photography wallcoverings called BIGS. Images in the BIGS collection include amethysts, minerals, crystals, sea coral, abalone, roses, sunflowers and butterflies.

FLIEPAPER art wallcovering
Crystal is part of the new BIGS collection of FLIEPAPER (www.fliepaper.com)

Inspired by the single-image wallcoverings of 1960s and 1970s interiors, Flood devised a proprietary process for shooting each subject in ultra-high-resolution and at very close range. He then had the images printed on a variety of new digitally printable wallcovering materials, including mylar. The results lend themselves to nearly any interior application from residential living rooms, dining rooms and bedrooms to commercial environments such as restaurants, office lobbies, and hotel public areas.

art wallcovering
This close-up photo of coral is part of the BIGS collection of FLIEPAPER. (www.fliepaper.com)

“We are very excited by what Don has created in BIGS,” said Aaron Kirsch, founder and CEO of Astek. “FLIEPAPER has proven popular with retail customers, interior designers, art directors and architects. It combines highly artistic, high-resolution images of beautiful things combined with the practical applications allowed by the material itself. We love partnering with Don, and we think BIGS will prove highly successful with both the residential and commercial marketplace.”

“When single image installations were in vogue some decades ago, the subject matter was usually a sunset or treescape, and the resolution was incredibly low,” notes Flood. “Inspired by an interiors shot I came across from the late ‘60s, I began to experiment with various images at extremely high resolution. Given the printing technology and materials available to us today, BIGS became a reality very quickly. I am excited to show how beautifully a high-resolution, single-image wallcovering transforms a space.”

art wallcovering of butterfly wing
This extreme close-up of a butterfly wing can be produced as an art wallcovering through FLIEPAPER (www.fliepaper.com)

3D Color Printing Is Simplified with Stratasys Creative Colors Software

DESIGNERS. Stratasys Ltd. is taking color 3D printing to a new level of realism and accessibility with the release of Stratasys Creative Colors Software, powered by the Adobe 3D Color Print Engine.

Available for use with Stratasys’ Objet Connex3 3D Printing solutions, the Creative Colors Software combines advanced color management with a direct design-to-3D print workflow. Stratasys and Adobe are both working to make 3D printing easier to use while increasing creativity.

Stratasys Creative Colors Software

Because Objet Connex 3 printers can combine a range of materials in every print job, designers can use the printers to make realistic prototypes that don’t require extra assembly and post-processing.

By forming a direct bridge between Adobe Photoshop CC and Objet Connex3, Creative Colors Software enables designers to 3D print their most imaginative creations without cumbersome 3D printing workflows.

1_Typical_3D_Printing_Workflow

2_Streamlined_Design_to_3D_Print_WorkflowStratasys Creative Colors empowers designers to use enhanced color tools such as vibrant gradient color palettes with expanded color spectrums, improved textures and patterns support, and time-saving color previews.

By incorporating multiple gradient colors, patterns, and textures, a model produced on the Objet Connex3 can have the same look and feel as the final intended product, vastly reducing product development times while increasing product quality.

3D color printing speaker model
Speaker model designed with Stratsys Creative Color Software

One company that has tried the Stratasys Creative Colors software is Saflio, a world leader in high-end and luxury eyewear.

“Safilo has recently improved its prototype development process thanks to the adoption of Stratasys Creative Colors Software,” said Vladimiro Baldin, Chief Product Design and Creation Officer at Safilo. “The ability to print prototypes with the same color and texture as the finished product, has significantly increased our speed in developing new eyeglass frames. Now, we can push the creative boundaries even further, quickly responding to market trends and reducing our prototyping cycle from three days to just three hours.”

Making Design for 3D Printing More Accessible

“Partnering with Adobe, a world leader in creative software products, aligns with Stratasys’ vision to make the color 3D printing experience as simple, powerful and rewarding as possible,” said Dan Yalon, EVP Business Development, Strategy and Vertical Solutions, Stratasys.

Stratasys has also introduced a new direct color workflow from Photoshop CC to the Stratasys Direct Manufacturing parts-on-demand service. Photoshop CC users can send colorful 3D files directly to Stratasys Direct Manufacturing for Objet Connex3 3D printing.

Features such as direct quoting, validation and previewing can help ensure that the printed design won’t exceed your budget.

“Adobe Photoshop CC users can now directly access Stratasys Objet Connex3 3D printers – whether locally or through Stratasys Direct Manufacturing – and easily produce their designs with gorgeous gradient color and fine details,” said Adil Munshi, VP and GM, Print and Publishing Business Unit, Adobe. “The combination of Adobe’s unmatched color expertise with Stratasys’ multi-color, multi-material 3D printing is a true game-changer for the creative design industry,”

Stratasys Creative Colors is now bundled with all new Objet Connex3 3D Printers and can also be purchased for existing Objet Connex3 systems.

 

Visual Design Pros Will Find Inspiration at HOW Design Live

Visual design professionals must keep pace with the multitude of changes in technologies, trends, and ideas that are affecting how we work, shop, and live. Because employers and clients expect designers to continually deliver fresh ideas and solutions, the HOW Design Live Conference for visual design professionals has updated the scope and content of its educational programs.

The 2016 HOW Design Live Conference is scheduled for May 19-23 at the Georgia World Conference Center in Atlanta. The conference program will bring together creators from design, art, culture, tech, and business to share their stories and accomplishments.

HOW Design Live Logo

“How Design Live is a once-in-a-lifetime gathering of inspiring speakers — an unbelievable line-up of luminaries,” said Gary Lynch, HOW Design Group Show Director. “Many have referred to the event as the TED of the design and creative community. It’s the best platform for professionals to gather an incredible amount of design inspiration and creative wisdom ”

Six program tracks enable creatives to discover new ways of thinking about their careers and insights into how design influences business strategies. The six program tracks include:

  • Design and Creativity
  • In-house Management
  • Vision and Leadership
  • Branding and Packaging
  • The Creative Entrepreneur
  • Interactive Design
  • Tools and Resources

Some presentations will give you a glimpse into technologies that can affect your work

Sci-Fi Meets Reality: The Future of Design
In a mind-bending keynote presentation, futurist Amy Webb will show how technology and design will soon begin to intersect in weird and wonderful ways. She will explain how algorithms are being used to design products, communities, and experiences. Webb will challenge designers to think hard about what to do now to prepare.

Other technology-related sessions will cover real-time data-driven design, designing for 3D, design challenges for a global audience, cinematic techniques for user-experience design, principles of motion design, and tools for taming the workflow beast.

Some sessions address the fact that many creative professionals want to do side projects that will may lead to new business opportunities or personal fulfillment.

Excuses Holding Entrepreneurs Back
Mona Patel, author of the bestselling book “Reframe: Shift the Way You Work, Innovate and Think,” will talk about four “excuse personas” that cause people to hesitate from pursuing ideas for new businesses.

Just Shoot It: Photos and Videos for Personal and Professional Creative Projects
In this 2-hour, hands-on workshop, designer and author Jim Krause will show how to use your designer’s eye and creative brain to come up with compelling images. Whether you use a pocket digital camera, a DSLR, or a smartphone camera, you can create images that look good enough for professional assignments or personal projects.

Licensing Know-How: Creative New Revenue Streams from Art + Design
The licensing industry generates $158.8 billion a year in worldwide retail sales. In this class, J’net Smith will detail how licensing works and  provide tips for recognizing  potential opportunities to license your art and designs in the marketplace.

Ignite Your Passion Project: A Side-Gig Seminar and Connecting Event
If there’s something you’re burning to create, but feel stuck in getting it started, this evening event might fire up your motivation Conference attendees and presenters will talk about how they have fostered successful side gigs, fulfilled their creative urges, and launched new businesses.

A full list of speakers and sessions can be found at www.howdesignlive.com. Early-bird registration rates are available until April 1, 2016

Expert Contends 3D Printing Will Rock the World

3DPrintingBook-Hornick3D printing is poised to revolutionize manufacturing and product design just as on-demand television has revolutionized the media industry.

In his new book, “3D Printing Will Rock the World,” intellectual property lawyer John Hornick explains why manufacturing on-demand is right around the corner. He believes the 3D printer may be the most powerful machine ever invented, and is on track to radically transform the planet.

“With the industrial revolution, people became buyers, not makers,” says Hornick. “But we are makers at heart. 3D printers enable us to become makers again. 3D printing will enable designers to create products that never existed before, revolutionize products, and democratize manufacturing.

The book discusses existing printing technology and ongoing materials research. It also provides dozens of real-life examples of how the technology will affect industries and consumers. Hornick believes 3D printing is already transforming our world in ways we never thought possible, creating artificial limbs, human tissue, and possibly human hearts.

In the book he explains:

  • how 3D printing will revolutionize product design, blurring the lines between manufacturing and customers
  • why companies will be forced to adapt their business models
  • how 3D printing may make the concept of a “genuine” product meaningless
  • the dark side of 3D printing, including its interplay with laws, crime, and national security

Ultimately Hornick concludes that mass production could be replaced by production by the masses, merging science and nature to create products that look more like they were grown than built.

3D printing will reinvent design because product designs will no longer need to be broken into multiple parts because of manufacturing constraints. As an example, the book notes that “Traditional manufacturing makes us use quarter-inch drills to bore quarter-inch holes, and designers and engineers design products accordingly. In a 3D-printing-enabled world, such constraints no longer exist. Designers simply specify a hole’s location; no tool is needed to drill it.”

“Designers can immerse themselves in the creative process because they can 3D print prototypes immediately,” explains Hornick. “The monotony of mass-produced designs can be replaced with mass-customized and mass-personalized designs.”

“As you read this book, think about the implications of 3D printing for your life, your job, your company, your country, and the world,” says Hornick. “Think about things you may never have dreamed of. Think outside the box.”

About the Author

John Hornick has more than 30 years of experience as a counselor and litigator at the Finnegan IP law firm, one of the largest IP firms in the world. As the founder of Finnegan’s 3D Printing Working Group, Hornick frequently speaks and writes on 3D printing. As the only IP attorney selected by the U.S. Comptroller General Forum on Additive Manufacturing, he is also a juror for the International Additive Manufacturing Award.