Fast Large-Format 3D Printer Produces Displays, Props, Objects up to 6 ft. Tall

A super-fast, large format 3D printer is set to transform the creation of high-level marketing, advertising, and themed-environment projects. The Massivit 1800 large format 3D printer can produce high-quality 3D pieces up to 6 ft. high at build speed of up to 1 ft. per hour.  It is being promoted to large-format graphics providers that specialize in creating eye-catching signs and displays.

Adding ‘the next dimension’ to visual communications, the Massivit 1800 is expected to change how creative directors, product designers, and marketers think about what’s possible with 3D models, displays, and brand promotion.

The Massivit 1800

The Massivit 1800 system is the fastest large format 3D printer on the market. It was developed by people who have dedicated their careers to delivering large-format digital printing equipment. As a group, the founders and managers have well over 100 years of experience in large-format digital printing and over 50 years of experience in 3D printing. They come from a variety of disciplines (management, engineering, printing, chemistry, and software) and have a substantial track record in R&D for companies such as Objet, HP Scitex, Idanit, and Scitex Vision.

At the heart of the Massivit 1800 system is a proprietary Gel Dispensing Printing (GDP) technology that enables instant solidification and high-speed printing. The gel is sensitive to UV light and solidifies into a hard polymer when it exposed to the LED UV light unit onboard the printer. The material is non-flammable and has a structural strength similar to the ABS materials commonly used in 3D printing.

Many objects designed for temporary promotional and decorative displays, movie sets, and themed environments don’t need to totally solid. Thus, they can be printed as only a “shell.” The Massivit 1800 printer saves production time and materials by printing non-vertical walls and ceilings without a solid or elaborate support structure.


“For print providers, the Massivit 1800 dramatically enhances the ability to create eye-catching visual communications that better engage target audiences,” said Avner Israeli, CEO, Massivit 3D.  Recent studies suggest that 3D advertising has five times the stopping power and four times the staying power of 2D advertising.

“Our products will enable marketing/brand managers to maximize the impact of their campaigns with a never-before-seen ‘wow factor.'” said Israeli.

Carisma Operates First Massivit 1800 in U.S.

The first Massivit 1800 in the United States is currently in operation at Carisma, a large-format printing company based in Brooklyn, New York.


Carisma helps companies execute one-of-a-kind advertising campaigns, many of which are on double-decker buses across America. Carisma plans to put the Massivit 1800 to work for some of these campaigns.

“As always, I was looking for the next big thing — a technology edge — that can help me bring something different to my customers,” said Moshe Gil, Carisma owner and CEO. To help customers create memorable and noticeable advertising, “We were the first to put LED screens on buses for advertising, and we are one of the first who printed lenticular lenses and placed them on buses. Now will be the first to have 3D-printed elements on buses.”

“We are happy to see how a print-service provider such as Carisma is putting the Massivit 1800 to work in the advertising world,” said Israeli. “As their name suggests, the team at Crarisma has a lot of charisma, and is driving the industry to great heights. 3-dimensional advertisments on buses are going to be a big hit.”

This retail display for a watch was created on a Massivit 1800 in Israel by ES Digital.
This retail display for a watch was created on a Massivit 1800 by ES Digital in Israel (


3D Color Printing Is Simplified with Stratasys Creative Colors Software

DESIGNERS. Stratasys Ltd. is taking color 3D printing to a new level of realism and accessibility with the release of Stratasys Creative Colors Software, powered by the Adobe 3D Color Print Engine.

Available for use with Stratasys’ Objet Connex3 3D Printing solutions, the Creative Colors Software combines advanced color management with a direct design-to-3D print workflow. Stratasys and Adobe are both working to make 3D printing easier to use while increasing creativity.

Stratasys Creative Colors Software

Because Objet Connex 3 printers can combine a range of materials in every print job, designers can use the printers to make realistic prototypes that don’t require extra assembly and post-processing.

By forming a direct bridge between Adobe Photoshop CC and Objet Connex3, Creative Colors Software enables designers to 3D print their most imaginative creations without cumbersome 3D printing workflows.


2_Streamlined_Design_to_3D_Print_WorkflowStratasys Creative Colors empowers designers to use enhanced color tools such as vibrant gradient color palettes with expanded color spectrums, improved textures and patterns support, and time-saving color previews.

By incorporating multiple gradient colors, patterns, and textures, a model produced on the Objet Connex3 can have the same look and feel as the final intended product, vastly reducing product development times while increasing product quality.

3D color printing speaker model
Speaker model designed with Stratsys Creative Color Software

One company that has tried the Stratasys Creative Colors software is Saflio, a world leader in high-end and luxury eyewear.

“Safilo has recently improved its prototype development process thanks to the adoption of Stratasys Creative Colors Software,” said Vladimiro Baldin, Chief Product Design and Creation Officer at Safilo. “The ability to print prototypes with the same color and texture as the finished product, has significantly increased our speed in developing new eyeglass frames. Now, we can push the creative boundaries even further, quickly responding to market trends and reducing our prototyping cycle from three days to just three hours.”

Making Design for 3D Printing More Accessible

“Partnering with Adobe, a world leader in creative software products, aligns with Stratasys’ vision to make the color 3D printing experience as simple, powerful and rewarding as possible,” said Dan Yalon, EVP Business Development, Strategy and Vertical Solutions, Stratasys.

Stratasys has also introduced a new direct color workflow from Photoshop CC to the Stratasys Direct Manufacturing parts-on-demand service. Photoshop CC users can send colorful 3D files directly to Stratasys Direct Manufacturing for Objet Connex3 3D printing.

Features such as direct quoting, validation and previewing can help ensure that the printed design won’t exceed your budget.

“Adobe Photoshop CC users can now directly access Stratasys Objet Connex3 3D printers – whether locally or through Stratasys Direct Manufacturing – and easily produce their designs with gorgeous gradient color and fine details,” said Adil Munshi, VP and GM, Print and Publishing Business Unit, Adobe. “The combination of Adobe’s unmatched color expertise with Stratasys’ multi-color, multi-material 3D printing is a true game-changer for the creative design industry,”

Stratasys Creative Colors is now bundled with all new Objet Connex3 3D Printers and can also be purchased for existing Objet Connex3 systems.


Expert Contends 3D Printing Will Rock the World

3DPrintingBook-Hornick3D printing is poised to revolutionize manufacturing and product design just as on-demand television has revolutionized the media industry.

In his new book, “3D Printing Will Rock the World,” intellectual property lawyer John Hornick explains why manufacturing on-demand is right around the corner. He believes the 3D printer may be the most powerful machine ever invented, and is on track to radically transform the planet.

“With the industrial revolution, people became buyers, not makers,” says Hornick. “But we are makers at heart. 3D printers enable us to become makers again. 3D printing will enable designers to create products that never existed before, revolutionize products, and democratize manufacturing.

The book discusses existing printing technology and ongoing materials research. It also provides dozens of real-life examples of how the technology will affect industries and consumers. Hornick believes 3D printing is already transforming our world in ways we never thought possible, creating artificial limbs, human tissue, and possibly human hearts.

In the book he explains:

  • how 3D printing will revolutionize product design, blurring the lines between manufacturing and customers
  • why companies will be forced to adapt their business models
  • how 3D printing may make the concept of a “genuine” product meaningless
  • the dark side of 3D printing, including its interplay with laws, crime, and national security

Ultimately Hornick concludes that mass production could be replaced by production by the masses, merging science and nature to create products that look more like they were grown than built.

3D printing will reinvent design because product designs will no longer need to be broken into multiple parts because of manufacturing constraints. As an example, the book notes that “Traditional manufacturing makes us use quarter-inch drills to bore quarter-inch holes, and designers and engineers design products accordingly. In a 3D-printing-enabled world, such constraints no longer exist. Designers simply specify a hole’s location; no tool is needed to drill it.”

“Designers can immerse themselves in the creative process because they can 3D print prototypes immediately,” explains Hornick. “The monotony of mass-produced designs can be replaced with mass-customized and mass-personalized designs.”

“As you read this book, think about the implications of 3D printing for your life, your job, your company, your country, and the world,” says Hornick. “Think about things you may never have dreamed of. Think outside the box.”

About the Author

John Hornick has more than 30 years of experience as a counselor and litigator at the Finnegan IP law firm, one of the largest IP firms in the world. As the founder of Finnegan’s 3D Printing Working Group, Hornick frequently speaks and writes on 3D printing. As the only IP attorney selected by the U.S. Comptroller General Forum on Additive Manufacturing, he is also a juror for the International Additive Manufacturing Award.

Adobe Expands Support for Easier 3D Printing Workflows

DESIGNERS. Last year, Adobe introduced new features in Photoshop CC to help simplify 3D compositing and printing. This year, Adobe is continuing to help you unlock the power of 3D printing by closing the gap between power and usability.

Adobe has added some important new 3D printing capabilities in their 2015 release of Creative Cloud and acquired Mixamo, a San Francisco-based company that enables you to create and customize 3D characters and animations.

In a blog post announcing the Mixamo acquisition, Adobe VP Winston Hendrickson noted that “3D tools have come a long way in the past few years, but are still generally inaccessible to most designers due to the great expense and extensive training required to learn the complicated techniques. However, using 3D in 2D workflows adds flexibility to the design work you’re already doing and delivers better output options for interactive websites, game content, video, and 3D printing. Our research tells us that one of the most in-demand skills for designers is 3D, but using it is just too hard with the current tools and technology.”

Support for PDF and SVX Formats

Adobe Photoshop CC _3D-printing-PDF-SVXThe latest release of Photoshop CC enables users, 3D printer manufacturers, and 3D printing service providers to use the ISO-standard 3D PDF file format to enable 3D printing job submissions and workflows. This can streamline processes and reduce costs, because the files are automatically checked and repaired prior to creating the 3D PDF file.

Photoshop CC users can also now use the SVX format to produce high quality, full color, sliced 3D models on color 3D printers. The 3D printing pipeline in Photoshop CC verifies and updates the file when converting to SVX.

Support for 3D Hubs 

Another new feature in the latest release of Photoshop CC is support for 3D printing through the 3D Hubs service. This enables Photoshop CC users to submit print jobs to local 3D-printing service providers who are members of the 3D Hubs worldwide network.

Currently more than 19,000 owners of 3D printers worldwide are part of the 3D Hubs service. Each listing for a 3D-printing service tells what type of equipment the service has, what types of materials they offer, and how quickly they can turn around the job. One of the goals of 3D Hubs is to accelerate a future of local and on-demand production. According to the company, the 3D Hubs network provides over one billion people access to a 3D printer within 10 miles of their home.

Support for Tinkerine Ditto Pro

The Tinkerine Ditto Pro is a prosumer-grade 3D printer that fits nicely in a classroom or design studio. Its elegant, open-C frame design makes it possible to build products that are taller and deeper than other 3D printers.

According to Eugene Suyu, president and CEO of Tinkerine Studios, “The prosumer market is demanding a 3D printer that features quiet operation along with high speed, high resolution, and massive build volume.”

Designers who want to print their work on a Tinkerine Ditto Pro can now download and install a printer profile from Photoshop CC. The installed profile will enable you to send a file directly from Photoshop CC.

“The integration of Tinkerine support within Photoshop CC makes it even easier for customers to access top-of-the-line 3D printers and training resources that will enable them to create compelling 3D objects,” said Maria Yap, Adobe senior director of production management, Photoshop.

Adobe Acquires Mixamo

Adobe believes the Mixamo acquisition will give creatives a platform for more 3D innovation in the future. Integrating Mixamo’s technology into Photoshop will let you create, customize, manipulate, rig and animate 3D content, as well as take advantage of stock characters that can be easily pulled into projects.

As Hendrickson explains in this blog post, designers will be able to generate more realistic scenes in lighting, reflections, and shadows.

“Designers are increasingly being asked to create photorealistic scenes that don’t exist in the real world,” said Hendrickson. “And while this is already being done in Photoshop CC today, we can push the envelope further to enable a level of precision like never before and to make it easier for everyone to use.”


Adobe Creative Cloud 2015

Blog Post: Unlocking the Power of 3D for the Creative Community

New 3D Printing Features in Adobe Photoshop CC


Order HP Sprout Immersive Computer Through

DESIGNERS., the official online store of  Make: and Maker Faire, has added the new Sprout desktop design platform by HP to its list of featured products. Customers can now purchase Sprout in Maker Shed.

MakerShedSprout is the world’s first immersive computer, which enables consumers to bring their projects to life through 3-D scanning, touch experiences, and high performance hardware and software.

“This computer is an incredibly innovative tool for Makers,” said Sonia Wong, General Manager of Commerce at Maker Media.  “We’re proud to have it available in Maker Shed because it’s changing the way people create and use technology for projects from art and design to prototyping.”

HP Sprout
HP Sprout

The initial idea for Sprout started as a collection of hardware and software to deliver a 2-D experience, but it grew into a powerful 3-D platform. With this type of creative computing technology, this computer has been able to break down the barriers between physical and digital, changing the way Makers engage and interact with the world around them.

“Our goal was to use Sprout to create new computing experiences by reimagining the way people collaborate and create projects,” said Eric Monsef, head of highly immersive systems at HP. “We designed it with Makers, artists and innovators in mind, so we’re excited that it’s now available at”

For under $2,000 customers can own this all-in-one computer for designing and creating projects. Users can capture real world objects in 3-D and apply and edit them from either Sprout’s touch screen or touch pad in an instant. With such a simple user interface, Sprout makes getting creative easy and fun for all ages. The computer is incredibly powerful, boasting an Intel Core i7 Processor, 1 terabyte of storage and a Windows operating system.

To learn more about the capabilities of Sprout and to purchase, visit the product page on

About Maker Media

Headquartered in San Francisco, Maker Media is the publisher of Make: magazine and the producer of Maker Faire. It also develops “getting started” kits and books that are sold in its Maker Shed store as well as in retail channels. The Make: brand caters to a universe of more than 25 million makers collectively across its Make: magazine,, Maker Faires, and Maker Shed properties.


Make: magazine

Maker Faire

Maker Shed

HP Sprout in Maker Shed


HP Unveils Technology for Immersive Computing and Faster 3D Printing

CGTrader Sees a Rise in 3D Design Skills

In the Internet’s early days, the “worldwide web” didn’t really start expanding until enough programmers had been trained to develop websites. Likewise, 3D printing can’t reach its full potential until more people have been trained to design all sorts of 3D-printable products.

One company that is helping to foster the growth of the 3D design community is Founded in Lithuania in 2011, this 3D model marketplace now has 150,000 registered users and unites 3D modeling professionals from around the world.



Recently passed a significant milestone in terms of growth. The number of models uploaded by CGTrader members rose from 10,238 in March, 2013 to more than 104,000 in March 2015.

3D-printable models are available in many categories, including aircraft, animals, household, science, architecture, gadgets, art, and fashion.

“Today, a novice consumer can go our site, download almost anything they can imagine, and send the file to a local 3D printer to pick up their model,” said Dalia Lasaite, CMO of CGTrader. com “Or, they can send the file to online printer and have the model shipped to them.”

Art, jewelry, and miniatures are currently generating the highest number of transactions.

“We started CGTrader to create fair and transparent working conditions for 3D professionals and have been uncompromising in our goals to always put the designer first,” said Marius Kalytis, CEO and founder of

While the massive publicity about 3D printing may have seemed a bit overblown at times, it has succeeded in encouraging more people to learn 3D design skills.

“While low-end 3D printers are underutilized by mainstream consumers, we believe the industry is just a few years away from producing consumer products with industrial 3D printers at mass manufacturing prices. This will create immense demand for 3D content and design skills,” said Dalia Lasaite, CMO of

Advice for Designers

Contributors to the CGTrader website come from very different backgrounds from all over the world. Designers can join for free and keep all the proceeds from their first sale. A 10% royalty fee is charged to continue selling the model on the site.

According to Lasaite, “Most designers are entrepreneurial and ambitious. Many of them are working as freelancers.”

Some designers and teams of designers are doing quite well financially, she notes, “Their main business is selling stock models, and they are living off it. Typically they have large portfolios of high quality models.”

For creative professionals who want to make money creating 3D-printable models , she offers these suggestions:

  • Think how you could create a large number of models with a high level of quality.
  • Specialize in your favorite field.
  • Think about your buyer.
  • Invest in model presentation.

As some of the earliest participants of the site have learned, patience and persistence can pay off. It’s unrealistic to expect to make a lot of money from a single model.

As your experience in designing 3D models grows, you may also find job opportunities through Some site visitors turn to to commission specific types of projects.


An Explanation of CGTrader’s Royalty Rates


Infographic of Sales and Search Data Helps 3D Model Designers

Infographics of Sales and Seach Data Help 3D Model Designers

DESIGNERS. If one of your goals is to become a best-selling 3D artist, the team at the 3D model marketplace CGTrader has published some useful data about which models sell best, how to price your models to grow your sales, and which 3D modeling categories are the top selling.

The first two infographics in the series were:

Exclusive Data on How to Sell 3D Models

Exclusive Tips for Maximizing Your Income for Selling 3D Models

CGTrader is is a community-based 3D model marketplace that was founded in 2011 by 3D designer Marius Kalytis. His goal was to create a just and favorable online platform for 3D designers seeking a mutually-beneficial partnership. As a 3D artist himself, Kalytis knew about existing platforms that paid little thought to fair royalty system for users. So, Marius started his own business marketplace granting generous royalties to 3D artists and vowing to democratize the 3D modeling market. CGTrader has evolved into a community were designers help each other, buyers and sellers communicate, jobs are offered, and innovation is sparked.

“We focused entirely on empowering 3D designers by giving them all the support we could think of: helping them sell, share and improve their work, take custom jobs and choose their clients,” added Kalytis. “This is a kind of freedom that I was seeking for myself and that every artist deserves.”

The site has quickly grown to include more than 120,000 registered users and about 85,000 3D models for sale.

To help designers better understand what types of models people are looking for, here is CGTrader’s newest infographics about the most popular search terms in 2014.

CGTrader 2014 search infographic


About CGTrader