Electric Objects Wants Everyone to Display Digital Art

Electric Objects is a digital art platform that wants to put digital art on a wall in every home. The company’s first two initiatives include the development of the EO1 display and Art Club collections.

EO1

EO1 is an Internet-connected screen designed specifically for art. In addition to displaying high-resolution images and digitally created art, EO1 can play video and animations. Priced at $299, EO1 fits elegantly into any home.

The matte 1080p high-definition display features ultra-wide viewing angles and ambient light awareness.  It is not too bright and not too muted. The EO1 was designed to look more like a luminous oil painting than a glowing monitor.

Electric Objects Display
The EO1 display. Art by Folkert Gorter.

With the free iOS or Android app, you can use your smartphone to change the art on the wall. You can explore thousands of artwork shared by the Electric Objects community or browse the curated collection of original work in Electric Objects’ Art Club. Display any art in the app with the tap of a button.

Art Club

Art Club is a collection of hundreds of original works of art made exclusively for Electric Objects. Through the Art Club, Electric Objects supports artists interested in making work for display on the EO1.

In 2016, the Electric Objects Art Club Fund expects to spend $100,000 to commission new works of digital art. Artists are selected through periodic open calls for applications. Selected artists receive a commission of $500 and a free EO1.

Electric Objects Display
Display by Electric Objects. Art by Zolloc.

Electric Objects introduces new collections two or three times a week. They immediately invite EO1 owners to display the art in their homes.

Electric Objects has displayed the work of Art Club Artists at NADA Miami, the New Museum in New York City, and at the Electric Objects showroom in New York.

To learn about open calls, sign up for the Electric Objects artist newsletter.

Artists, Investors, and Innovators Launch Upstart Co-Lab

A group of artists, investors, philanthropic funders, and social innovators have launched Upstart Co-Lab. The collaborative arts organization is designed to:

Increase opportunities for artists as innovators by encouraging greater recognition of artists’ accomplishments in the private, social and public sectors;

Catalyze more capital for creativity by making creativity investable through public equity, debt and venture capital investment products;

Enable sustainable creative lives by equipping artists with crucial skills for executing their ideas, and linking eligible artists to existing social services and subsidies.

Upstart is funded by Ford Foundation, The Rockefeller Foundation, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and Surdna Foundation with in-kind support from the F.B. Heron Foundation. Upstart is a sponsored project of Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors.

“Artists are the original social entrepreneurs. They make our society stronger because of who they are, how they approach the world, and the risks they are willing to take,” said founding partner Laura Callanan, the former senior deputy chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts. “But because other social changemakers don’t realize what artists are doing, artist-innovators often have to go it alone. By creating this national collaboration between artists, impact investors, sustainable companies and other partners, we can fix this.”

UpstartCo-Lab-Logo

Upstart Co-Lab will be based in New York but is national in scope. Upstart Co-Lab has conducted hundreds of conversations with arts and innovation leaders to inform a portfolio of projects and develop the partnerships that will advance them.

Upstart will work in three ways:

Adapting successful models for the arts and creativity. By repurposing models from impact investing, community development and social entrepreneurship, Upstart will  catalyze  fresh  opportunities  for artists. By emulating the Social Capitalist Awards that popularized the concept of the social entrepreneur, Upstart will recognize artists and designers who have launched innovative companies such as Kickstarter, AirBnB and Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams. Upstart will also recognize artists working on issues such as environmental conservation, criminal justice system reform, and effective government.

Integrating the arts into existing systems and standards. Today there are no options for the mission-related investor committed to the arts and creativity. Upstart will launch a Creative Economy Index Fund of U.S. public companies across the creative industries, enabling targeted investment in creativity for the first time. This product will integrate values of sustainability by focusing on companies that lower the cost for the design, fabrication and distribution of creative work, or that enable individuals to be creators, not just consumers.

Developing new initiatives designed to respond to gaps and market failures. Artists face some unique challenges. For example, to address the persistently low rate at which arts graduates actually make their living by working in the arts, ArtPath will rethink the resources and skills artists need at every stage of their career life cycles – to launch new projects, start commercial enterprises, and better manage their careers.

“The creative economy is all around us, but the problem is we don’t recognize it,” said Veris Wealth Partners Partner Anders Faijersson Ferguson. “Because we don’t understand how big a difference artists and innovators make in our local and global economy, their role is somewhat invisible. By helping their contributions be better understood and valued, more investment capital will be made available. And the catalytic role artists play in achieving impact and bringing positive economic change will increase.”

Strategic Partners

To implement these initiatives, Upstart Co-Lab is engaging with arts organizations, social innovators, impact investors, universities and others. To date, Upstart’s strategic partners include Arizona State University, Artspace, B Lab, Bennington College, Calvert Foundation, Foundation Center, Global Development Incubator, Maryland Institute College of Arts, McKinsey & Company, Oberlin College, Veris Wealth Partners, and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts.

A portfolio of five projects is under development and will be implemented by the end of 2016. More information about the organization can be found at http://www.upstartco-lab.org.

 

Promote Your Art Online Without Killing Your Soul

If the thought of pricing and promoting your art makes you profoundly uncomfortable, check out the business consulting services of artist Laura C. George.

Laura C. George is a business consultant for artists who want to “price to sell without being a sleazeball” and “make a profit, without ripping off your customers.” She also helps artists who aren’t sure how to promote themselves in the ever-shifting landscape of online communications.

LauraCGeorge

George believes that technology has so thoroughly transformed the art market that some artists are losing ground because they don’t know how to navigate the new landscape.

Laura C George HeadshotShe recalls working with an artist who was huge in Boston the ’80s. According to George,”She would just walk into galleries and they were thrilled to be able to put her work up. She never wanted for money. But over the last 10 years, her sales have tanked because she didn’t have a professional-looking website or an email list. And she didn’t know how to connect with and approach people through the internet. She was relying on outdated and ineffective strategies such as press releases and hoping a gallery would call her.”

As a result of this experience, Laura George has made it her mission to help educate artists in similar situations, and those just starting out and are unsure of best practices. She wants artists to find ways to promote themselves in a way that feels natural, not soul-killing.

“I want artists to feel in control of their businesses,” explains George. “I want them to feel like their success is in their own hands and not handed to them by a gatekeeper gallerist, agent, or rich collector.”

To help artists see what’s possible, Laura has posted two free webinars that you can download and view at your convenience.

The Art of Getting Press: Making the Media Love Your Art
In this 90-minute webinar, Laura explains how you can start getting the media attention you deserve. She explains how to find the right publication and write an effective pitch. She also talks about what to do after you’ve sent the pitch and presents examples of artists who have successfully gotten the attention of the press.

Art in Your Inbox: Email Marketing for Artists
In this 80-minute webinar, Laura discusses why email works and how you’ll benefit. She explains how to lay-out your emails for maximum effectiveness and how often to send emails. You’ll also see how email fits into your overall marketing strategy and get a step-by-step formula for writing fantastic emails. A bonus worksheet can help you plan out all your emails for the year.

Check Out Her Blog!

You can also find some great advice on her blog. Recent posts have covered topics such as the 7 Types of Art Customers and Looking Professional.

Looking professional matters, says George, because people are more likely to buy from artists who don’t appear flighty: “When most people first get to an artist’s website, they’re looking for some sort of proof that the artist will actually ship the art if they buy, that the art will actually look like it did in the picture, that there won’t be any hassles through the process, and that if something goes wrong, the artist is going to fix it”  To sell your art online, it’s not enough that people love your art. Art buyers need evidence they can trust you to deliver.

LINKS

Laura C. George, Business Consultant for Artists

Webinar: The Art of Getting Press

Webinar: Art in Your Inbox; Email Marketing for Artists

 

Studio F Provides New Art Marketing and Display Opportunities

Studio F is a new art marketing platform through which artists can sell their work as high-quality vinyl decals and wrapped canvases on fathead.com. Part of the Fathead family of companies, Studio F uses the marketing prowess and reach of the Fathead brand along with Fathead’s digital graphic technology to reproduce curated artists’ work as decals that buyers can display as frameless wall art, furniture enhancements, or window art.

Colorful Launch over Thanksgiving Weekend

To demonstrate the full potential and scale of Studio F’s creative capabilities, Detroit artists Ellen Rutt and Patrick Ethen were commissioned to create RADIANT CITY, a large-scale public art installation that in downtown Detroit. The artists were commissioned to help create an exciting experience to unveil Studio F and the transformative nature of the product.

Fathead launches Studio F, a new artist portal, with stunning exhibit RADIANT CITY in downtown Detroit (PRNewsFoto/Fathead LLC)
Fathead launches Studio F, a new artist portal, with stunning exhibit RADIANT CITY in downtown Detroit (PRNewsFoto/Fathead LLC)

The installation was open November 25-27 during the festivities surrounding America’s Thanksgiving Parade presented by Art Van.

Rutt and Ethen designed over 300 one-of-a-kind patterns that were sampled from Detroit architecture, printed on Fathead vinyl, and applied to the tops of tables by IKEA, the world’s largest furniture retailer. Using downtown Detroit’s beautiful, historic Grand Circus Park as their canvas, Rutt and Ethen arranged the tables to form an enormous mosaic and immersive color field around the Russell Alger Memorial Fountain.

“The patchwork quilt is a powerful metaphor for Detroit,” says Ethen, “there are so many people, ideas and cultures at play. This city is best understood as a plurality—nothing less than the sum of its parts.”

The duo explored Detroit to archive a collection of patterns from all over the city. “It’s important for us to make work that’s imbued with a sense of place,” adds Rutt, “There’s such a rich creative history in Detroit, so much inspiration surrounding us already, that sourcing patterns from local architecture was an obvious choice. RADIANT CITY symbolically references the present cultural climate, the energy and passion that is so tangible here.”

After the exhibit closed, some of the art-topped tables in RADIANT CITY for Studio F were donated to Humble Design, a non-profit group that provides furnishings and design services to families transitioning out of homeless shelters. The remaining tables will be sold on  December 1 in celebration of #GivingTuesday, a global day dedicated to giving back. All proceeds will go to Humble Design.

RADIANT CITY for Studio F was a colorful launch celebration for Studio F. Fathead worked with Minneapolis based advertising agency Fallon Worldwide to develop the launch idea and choose Ellen Rutt and Patrick Ethen as the first artists to be featured on the Studio F website.

“Studio F is the next evolution of Fathead,” said Joanna Cline, chief marketing officer, Fathead. “We can now offer our quality products, stellar marketing support and customer service to the artistic community.” Established artists and “artists to watch” will be able to expand their art collections to this dynamic new online gallery.

Information about how to apply for inclusion in the Studio F gallery and earn commissions for the sale of your work can be found on the Studio F website.

LINKS

Studio F

 

Handbook Shows How to Design Your Own Fabric, Wallpaper, or Gift Wrap

To encourage novices in surface design, Spoonflower has published “The Spoonflower Handbook: A DIY Guide to Designing Fabric, Wallpaper, and Gift Wrap.”

Not long ago, few artists ever had the chance to design fabrics and wallpaper because printing even a few yards required a significant financial investment. Today, thanks to digital, print-on-demand printing, anyone with a computer, Internet connection, and idea can upload a file and have their design printed on a yard of fabric, wallpaper, or wrapping paper.

Spoonflower, a North Carolina-based start-up, prints short runs of fabrics, peel-and-stick wallpapers, and wrapping-papers for hundreds of thousands of creative people worldwide. Spoonflower customers then incorporate their printed designs into thousands of creative projects for the home or wardrobe.

For example, the handbook shows you how to use digitally printed materials to make:

  • A world traveler pillowcase with map designs
  • A stuffed gnome toy
  • Pet silhouette hankies
  • Zippered fabric pouches
  • Autumn leaf table wrap
  • Typographic wrapping paper
  • Food for thought table runner
  • Photo panel wall art
  • Damask shower curtain
  • Portrait pillows
  • Infinity scarf
  • Color-chip lampshade
  • Family portraits necktie
  • Coloring wallpaper and desk wrap

Designs on peel-and-stick wallpaper can be used to personalize your laptop, tablet, phone, and other flat surfaces.

Written in easy-to-understand language, this beautifully illustrated, 207-page book covers everything from design equipment and software to working with photos, colors, scans, repeats, and vector files. It talks about sources of inspiration and explains how to source images and use them legally.

The book was written by Spoonflower co-founder Stephen Fraser with Judi Ketteler and Becka Rahn. Jenny Hallengren provided the photographs. It was published by the Steward, Tabori & Chang imprint of Abrams.

According to Fraser, the project ideas and information in the Spoonflower Handbook can help everyone from quilters and crafty parents to professional artists and aspiring fashion designers: “We set out to create the most approachable book possible…This book is about the joy of making something mingled with the challenge of learning new things.”

LINKS

The Spoonflower Handbook: A DIY Guide to Designing Fabric, Wallpaper & Gift Wrap with 30+ Projects

Spoonflower

Artplode Sells Art for a Flat Fee Instead of Commissions

The days of paying commission to sell art are over, according to Maureen McCarthy founder and CEO of Artplode. Artplode is a cutting-edge platform where art is traded directly between buyers and sellers all over the world.

Artplode allows everyone – artists, collectors, dealers and galleries–to list art for sale for a one-off fixed fee of $60 per artwork with no commission charged to either buyers or sellers.

The site has attracted millions of dollars in listings of artworks from sellers in more than 40 countries since it launched in August 2014. Art can be purchased on Artplode at prices beginning at $1,000 to $126,000 for Andy Warhol’s Marilyn 26 lithograph.

Andy Warhol Marilyn 26 lithograph
Andy Warhol Marilyn 26 lithograph 1967 (PRNewsFoto/Artplode)

Artplode was created by the international art dealer to meet a gap she identified in the art market and to give art collectors a low-cost alternative to resell quality artworks.

McCarthy, who for 20 years was an agent for the publishing arm of the John Lennon estate, represents a number of respected dealers in works by the Masters including Monet, Picasso and Boccioni. She predicts Artplode will be a forerunner of the demise of auction houses that charge 40 percent or higher commission on sales and online art sales websites clinging to outmoded commission-based business models.

Prominent galleries in the UK, US, Europe and Australia have embraced the site where works by collectible artists Banksy, Andy Warhol, and John Lennon are for sale alongside art by savvy emerging artists who see value in marketing and selling their art alongside works by the Masters.

“The absurd rates of commission charged by auction houses to resell art, in some instances exceeding 50% of the hammer price has left many collectors looking for a better way to sell art,” McCarthy says.

She sees no reason why artists or anyone else should pay online galleries commission to sell art: “It is absolutely crazy that some websites are charging artists and collectors 30% or more in commission to sell their art online. Equally outrageous is the practice of some art sales websites requiring artists to sign exclusivity agreements that prohibit artists from listing their art for sale anywhere else.”

Artplode was created to be easy to use for buyers and sellers. Sellers list information about the artwork, upload photographs, discuss questions directly with potential buyers and arrange payment and shipping the art themselves. Specialist art consultants are available to assist buyers and sellers.

Collectors can quickly and easily navigate Artplode to find works listed by sellers in their own country or search by fine art category, subject, medium, style, country of origin of the artwork, size and price.

LINKS

Artplode

Art Lover Wants to Make Visiting Online Galleries More Enjoyable

A new curated online art gallery is on a mission to make the process of viewing art online more like visiting a gallery than searching through a warehouse.

Crimson Lake by Alice (Hye Ryung) Yang
Crimson Lake by artist Alice (Hye Ryung) Yang

In the Love It Art online gallery, art lovers can discover and collect contemporary art and design from emerging artists in Vancouver, British Columbia and beyond.

“Love It” exemplifies the moment when an art lover really likes what he/she sees. To facilitate these types of moments, Love It Art gallery will have a year-round art calendar that showcases emerging talents from around the globe.

Love It Art is the brainchild of Mina Fung, a Chartered Accountant in Canada and a Certified Public Accountant in the US. After working more than 10 years in the accounting and corporate finance world, Fung found her calling in the art world in 2014.

After many attempts to find artworks she loved by visiting galleries and viewing online warehouse platforms, Fung decided to combine her passion for art with her business background to launch Love It Art. Her goal is to provide a personable and enjoyable experience for art lovers and offer a non-crowded space for artists to showcase their work and tell their stories.

“Art has been a passion since I was a kid.” Mina Fung says. “I have fun connecting with artists and learning about their creative processes. I want to bring the fun factor to the art lovers. When it comes to buying art, art lovers themselves are the experts on what they want. I just need to provide an environment for facilitating their discovery and selection process. With a diverse background, professionally and culturally, I can help source art to suit people’s taste, style and budget.”

The gallery has a roster of twelve artists including Vancouver-based artists Rebecca Chaperon, Sarah Gee Miller and Mira Song, as well as Seoul-based artist Alice (Hye Ryung) Yang. The gallery mainly shows original contemporary art and design that is visually stunning, vibrant and whimsical.

To see the scale and impact of the artworks, art lovers can visit the gallery’s virtual 3D exhibition anywhere and at any time, from desktop computers or mobile devices.

The first virtual exhibition is called “Transcendence” and showcases the large-scale works of Alice (Hye Ryung) Yang. This solo exhibition is on view through May 19, 2015.A

At the bottom of the  FAQ page, emerging artists can find more details on the types of works Mina Fung is interested in displaying and instructions for submitting art for consideration.

LINKS

Love It Art